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中国姚記娱乐网可信吗 注册

中国姚記娱乐网可信吗注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:毛孝泉 大小:vEm8sntG26345KB 下载:efSjTeEe42112次
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日期:2020-08-05 22:16:55
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刘扬丰

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "He said this to draw me out, but I was too cunning to be caughtin that way, so I answered with a lie; 'Neptune,' said I, 'sent myship on to the rocks at the far end of your country, and wrecked it.We were driven on to them from the open sea, but I and those who arewith me escaped the jaws of death.'
2.  Then he went downstairs again, leaving Penelope in an agony ofgrief. There were plenty of seats in the house, but she. had noheart for sitting on any one of them; she could only fling herselfon the floor of her own room and cry; whereon all the maids in thehouse, both old and young, gathered round her and began to cry too,till at last in a transport of sorrow she exclaimed,
3.  Thus he spoke, and Mercury, guide and guardian, slayer of Argus, didas he was told. Forthwith he bound on his glittering golden sandalswith which he could fly like the wind over land and sea. He took thewand with which he seals men's eyes in sleep or wakes them just ashe pleases, and flew holding it in his hand over Pieria; then heswooped down through the firmament till he reached the level of thesea, whose waves he skimmed like a cormorant that flies fishingevery hole and corner of the ocean, and drenching its thick plumage inthe spray. He flew and flew over many a weary wave, but when at lasthe got to the island which was his journey's end, he left the seaand went on by land till he came to the cave where the nymph Calypsolived.
4.  This was what they said, but they did not know what it was thathad been happening. The upper servant Eurynome washed and anointedUlysses in his own house and gave him a shirt and cloak, while Minervamade him look taller and stronger than before; she also made thehair grow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders justas a skilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcanor Minerva- and his work is full of beauty- enriches a piece of silverplate by gilding it. He came from the bath looking like one of theimmortals, and sat down opposite his wife on the seat he had left. "Mydear," said he, "heaven has endowed you with a heart more unyieldingthan woman ever yet had. No other woman could bear to keep away fromher husband when he had come back to her after twenty years ofabsence, and after having gone through so much. But come, nurse, get abed ready for me; I will sleep alone, for this woman has a heart ashard as iron."
5.  Then she called her maids and said, "Stay where you are, yougirls. Can you not see a man without running away from him? Do youtake him for a robber or a murderer? Neither he nor any one else cancome here to do us Phaeacians any harm, for we are dear to the gods,and live apart on a land's end that juts into the sounding sea, andhave nothing to do with any other people. This is only some poor manwho has lost his way, and we must be kind to him, for strangers andforeigners in distress are under Jove's protection, and will take whatthey can get and be thankful; so, girls, give the poor fellowsomething to eat and drink, and wash him in the stream at some placethat is sheltered from the wind."
6.  "Sir, give me something; you are not, surely, the poorest manhere; you seem to be a chief, foremost among them all; therefore youshould be the better giver, and I will tell far and wide of yourbounty. I too was a rich man once, and had a fine house of my own;in those days I gave to many a tramp such as I now am, no matter whohe might be nor what he wanted. I had any number of servants, andall the other things which people have who live well and are accountedwealthy, but it pleased Jove to take all away from me. He sent me witha band of roving robbers to Egypt; it was a long voyage and I wasundone by it. I stationed my bade ships in the river Aegyptus, andbade my men stay by them and keep guard over them, while sent outscouts to reconnoitre from every point of vantage.

计划指导

1.  When the bright star that heralds the approach of dawn began toshow. the ship drew near to land. Now there is in Ithaca a haven ofthe old merman Phorcys, which lies between two points that break theline of the sea and shut the harbour in. These shelter it from thestorms of wind and sea that rage outside, so that, when once withinit, a ship may lie without being even moored. At the head of thisharbour there is a large olive tree, and at no distance a fineoverarching cavern sacred to the nymphs who are called Naiads. Thereare mixing-bowls within it and wine-jars of stone, and the bees hivethere. Moreover, there are great looms of stone on which the nymphsweave their robes of sea purple- very curious to see- and at all timesthere is water within it. It has two entrances, one facing North bywhich mortals can go down into the cave, while the other comes fromthe South and is more mysterious; mortals cannot possibly get in byit, it is the way taken by the gods.
2.  When he had thus spoken, he went back to the house and took the seatthat he had left. Presently, his two servants followed him inside.
3.  "To this he gave me but a pitiless answer, 'Stranger,' said he, 'youare a fool, or else you know nothing of this country. Talk to me,indeed, about fearing the gods or shunning their anger? We Cyclopes donot care about Jove or any of your blessed gods, for we are ever somuch stronger than they. I shall not spare either yourself or yourcompanions out of any regard for Jove, unless I am in the humour fordoing so. And now tell me where you made your ship fast when youcame on shore. Was it round the point, or is she lying straight offthe land?'
4.  "Do we know, Menelaus," said she, "the names of these strangerswho have come to visit us? Shall I guess right or wrong?-but Icannot help saying what I think. Never yet have I seen either man orwoman so like somebody else (indeed when I look at him I hardly knowwhat to think) as this young man is like Telemachus, whom Ulysses leftas a baby behind him, when you Achaeans went to Troy with battle inyour hearts, on account of my most shameless self."
5.  As he spoke he drew his keen blade of bronze, sharpened on bothsides, and with a loud cry sprang towards Ulysses, but Ulyssesinstantly shot an arrow into his breast that caught him by thenipple and fixed itself in his liver. He dropped his sword and felldoubled up over his table. The cup and all the meats went over on tothe ground as he smote the earth with his forehead in the agonies ofdeath, and he kicked the stool with his feet until his eyes wereclosed in darkness.
6.  "My poor good man," said she, "why is Neptune so furiously angrywith you? He is giving you a great deal of trouble, but for all hisbluster he will not kill you. You seem to be a sensible person, dothen as I bid you; strip, leave your raft to drive before the wind,and swim to the Phaecian coast where better luck awaits you. And here,take my veil and put it round your chest; it is enchanted, and you cancome to no harm so long as you wear it. As soon as you touch land takeit off, throw it back as far as you can into the sea, and then go awayagain." With these words she took off her veil and gave it him. Thenshe dived down again like a sea-gull and vanished beneath the darkblue waters.

推荐功能

1.  Thus did they converse. Meanwhile the suitors were hatching a plotto murder Telemachus: but a bird flew near them on their left hand- aneagle with a dove in its talons. On this Amphinomus said, "My friends,this plot of ours to murder Telemachus will not succeed; let us goto dinner instead."
2.  "They sang these words most musically, and as I longed to hearthem further I made by frowning to my men that they should set mefree; but they quickened their stroke, and Eurylochus and Perimedesbound me with still stronger bonds till we had got out of hearing ofthe Sirens' voices. Then my men took the wax from their ears andunbound me.
3.  "'Stranger,' said she, 'I will make it all quite clear to you. Aboutthe time when the sun shall have reached mid heaven, the old man ofthe sea comes up from under the waves, heralded by the West windthat furs the water over his head. As soon as he has come up he liesdown, and goes to sleep in a great sea cave, where the seals-Halosydne's chickens as they call them- come up also from the greysea, and go to sleep in shoals all round him; and a very strong andfish-like smell do they bring with them. Early to-morrow morning Iwill take you to this place and will lay you in ambush. Pick out,therefore, the three best men you have in your fleet, and I willtell you all the tricks that the old man will play you.
4.  On this Telemachus went by torch-light to the other side of theinner court, to the room in which he always slept. There he lay in hisbed till morning, while Ulysses was left in the cloister ponderingon the means whereby with Minerva's help he might be able to killthe suitors.
5.   "Trust me for that," said she, "I will not lose sight of you whenonce we set about it, and I would imagine that some of those who aredevouring your substance will then bespatter the pavement with theirblood and brains. I will begin by disguising you so that no humanbeing shall know you; I will cover your body with wrinkles; youshall lose all your yellow hair; I will clothe you in a garment thatshall fill all who see it with loathing; I will blear your fine eyesfor you, and make you an unseemly object in the sight of thesuitors, of your wife, and of the son whom you left behind you. Thengo at once to the swineherd who is in charge of your pigs; he has beenalways well affected towards you, and is devoted to Penelope andyour son; you will find him feeding his pigs near the rock that iscalled Raven by the fountain Arethusa, where they are fattening onbeechmast and spring water after their manner. Stay with him andfind out how things are going, while I proceed to Sparta and seeyour son, who is with Menelaus at Lacedaemon, where he has gone to tryand find out whether you are still alive."
6.  "Meanwhile Lampetie went straight off to the sun and told him we hadbeen killing his cows, whereon he flew into a great rage, and saidto the immortals, 'Father Jove, and all you other gods who live ineverlasting bliss, I must have vengeance on the crew of Ulysses' ship:they have had the insolence to kill my cows, which were the onething I loved to look upon, whether I was going up heaven or downagain. If they do not square accounts with me about my cows, I will godown to Hades and shine there among the dead.'

应用

1.  Thus did they converse, and they had only a very little time leftfor sleep, for it was soon daybreak. In the meantime Telemachus andhis crew were nearing land, so they loosed the sails, took down themast, and rowed the ship into the harbour. They cast out their mooringstones and made fast the hawsers; they then got out upon the seashore, mixed their wine, and got dinner ready. As soon as they had hadenough to eat and drink Telemachus said, "Take the ship on to thetown, but leave me here, for I want to look after the herdsmen onone of my farms. In the evening, when I have seen all I want, I willcome down to the city, and to-morrow morning in return for yourtrouble I will give you all a good dinner with meat and wine."
2.  "I also saw fair Epicaste mother of king OEdipodes whose awful lotit was to marry her own son without suspecting it. He married herafter having killed his father, but the gods proclaimed the wholestory to the world; whereon he remained king of Thebes, in great grieffor the spite the gods had borne him; but Epicaste went to the houseof the mighty jailor Hades, having hanged herself for grief, and theavenging spirits haunted him as for an outraged mother- to his ruingbitterly thereafter.
3.  Melanthius lit the fire, and set a seat covered with sheep skinsbeside it. He also brought a great ball of lard from what they hadin the house, and the suitors warmed the bow and again made trial ofit, but they were none of them nearly strong enough to string it.Nevertheless there still remained Antinous and Eurymachus, who werethe ringleaders among the suitors and much the foremost among themall.
4、  This frightened Irus still more, but they brought him into themiddle of the court, and the two men raised their hands to fight. ThenUlysses considered whether he should let drive so hard at him as tomake an end of him then and there, or whether he should give him alighter blow that should only knock him down; in the end he deemedit best to give the lighter blow for fear the Achaeans should begin tosuspect who he was. Then they began to fight, and Irus hit Ulysseson the right shoulder; but Ulysses gave Irus a blow on the neckunder the ear that broke in the bones of his skull, and the blood camegushing out of his mouth; he fell groaning in the dust, gnashing histeeth and kicking on the ground, but the suitors threw up theirhands and nearly died of laughter, as Ulysses caught hold of him bythe foot and dragged him into the outer court as far as thegate-house. There he propped him up against the wall and put his staffin his hands. "Sit here," said he, "and keep the dogs and pigs off;you are a pitiful creature, and if you try to make yourself king ofthe beggars any more you shall fare still worse."
5、  Outside the gate of the outer court there is a large garden of aboutfour acres with a wall all round it. It is full of beautiful trees-pears, pomegranates, and the most delicious apples. There are lusciousfigs also, and olives in full growth. The fruits never rot nor failall the year round, neither winter nor summer, for the air is sosoft that a new crop ripens before the old has dropped. Pear growson pear, apple on apple, and fig on fig, and so also with thegrapes, for there is an excellent vineyard: on the level ground of apart of this, the grapes are being made into raisins; in anotherpart they are being gathered; some are being trodden in the wine tubs,others further on have shed their blossom and are beginning to showfruit, others again are just changing colour. In the furthest partof the ground there are beautifully arranged beds of flowers thatare in bloom all the year round. Two streams go through it, the oneturned in ducts throughout the whole garden, while the other iscarried under the ground of the outer court to the house itself, andthe town's people draw water from it. Such, then, were thesplendours with which the gods had endowed the house of king Alcinous.

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网友评论(r82U3tOH35848))

  • 李宛蓉 08-04

      When Euryclea heard this she began to cry, and spoke fondly tohim, saying, "My dear child, what ever can have put such notion asthat into your head? Where in the world do you want to go to- you, whoare the one hope of the house? Your poor father is dead and gone insome foreign country nobody knows where, and as soon as your back isturned these wicked ones here will be scheming to get you put out ofthe way, and will share all your possessions among themselves; staywhere you are among your own people, and do not go wandering andworrying your life out on the barren ocean."

  • 張杰 08-04

      "Hear me," he cried, "you god who visited me yesterday, and bademe sail the seas in search of my father who has so long beenmissing. I would obey you, but the Achaeans, and more particularly thewicked suitors, are hindering me that I cannot do so."

  • 韩男星 08-04

       The suitors bit their lips, and marvelled at the boldness of hisspeech; then Antinous said, "We do not like such language but wewill put up with it, for Telemachus is threatening us in good earnest.If Jove had let us we should have put a stop to his brave talk erenow."

  • 任群芳 08-04

      "After him I saw mighty Hercules, but it was his phantom only, forhe is feasting ever with the immortal gods, and has lovely Hebe towife, who is daughter of Jove and Juno. The ghosts were screaminground him like scared birds flying all whithers. He looked black asnight with his bare bow in his hands and his arrow on the string,glaring around as though ever on the point of taking aim. About hisbreast there was a wondrous golden belt adorned in the most marvellousfashion with bears, wild boars, and lions with gleaming eyes; therewas also war, battle, and death. The man who made that belt, do whathe might, would never be able to make another like it. Hercules knewme at once when he saw me, and spoke piteously, saying, my poorUlysses, noble son of Laertes, are you too leading the same sorry kindof life that I did when I was above ground? I was son of Jove, but Iwent through an infinity of suffering, for I became bondsman to onewho was far beneath me- a low fellow who set me all manner of labours.He once sent me here to fetch the hell-hound- for he did not thinkhe could find anything harder for me than this, but I got the houndout of Hades and brought him to him, for Mercury and Minerva helpedme.'

  • 邱均平 08-03

    {  "'Stranger,' replied she, 'I will make it all quite clear to you.There is an old immortal who lives under the sea hereabouts andwhose name is Proteus. He is an Egyptian, and people say he is myfather; he is Neptune's head man and knows every inch of ground allover the bottom of the sea. If you can snare him and hold him tight,he will tell you about your voyage, what courses you are to take,and how you are to sail the sea so as to reach your home. He will alsotell you, if you so will, all that has been going on at your houseboth good and bad, while you have been away on your long and dangerousjourney.'

  • 王玉江 08-02

      "'What ails you, Polyphemus,' said they, 'that you make such anoise, breaking the stillness of the night, and preventing us frombeing able to sleep? Surely no man is carrying off your sheep?Surely no man is trying to kill you either by fraud or by force?}

  • 姚亚茹 08-02

      Then Telemachus went out of the court to the place where theAchaeans were meeting in assembly; he had his spear in his hand, andhe was not alone, for his two dogs went with him. But Eurycleacalled the maids and said, "Come, wake up; set about sweeping thecloisters and sprinkling them with water to lay the dust; put thecovers on the seats; wipe down the tables, some of you, with a wetsponge; clean out the mixing-jugs and the cups, and for water from thefountain at once; the suitors will be here directly; they will be hereearly, for it is a feast day."

  • 瞿秋白 08-02

      "Trust me for that," said she, "I will not lose sight of you whenonce we set about it, and I would imagine that some of those who aredevouring your substance will then bespatter the pavement with theirblood and brains. I will begin by disguising you so that no humanbeing shall know you; I will cover your body with wrinkles; youshall lose all your yellow hair; I will clothe you in a garment thatshall fill all who see it with loathing; I will blear your fine eyesfor you, and make you an unseemly object in the sight of thesuitors, of your wife, and of the son whom you left behind you. Thengo at once to the swineherd who is in charge of your pigs; he has beenalways well affected towards you, and is devoted to Penelope andyour son; you will find him feeding his pigs near the rock that iscalled Raven by the fountain Arethusa, where they are fattening onbeechmast and spring water after their manner. Stay with him andfind out how things are going, while I proceed to Sparta and seeyour son, who is with Menelaus at Lacedaemon, where he has gone to tryand find out whether you are still alive."

  • 赵宝军 08-01

       "But I would not listen to them, and shouted out to him in myrage, 'Cyclops, if any one asks you who it was that put your eye outand spoiled your beauty, say it was the valiant warrior Ulysses, sonof Laertes, who lives in Ithaca.'

  • 陈安华 07-30

    {  ULYSSES was left in the cloister, pondering on the means wherebywith Minerva's help he might be able to kill the suitors. Presently hesaid to Telemachus, "Telemachus, we must get the armour together andtake it down inside. Make some excuse when the suitors ask you why youhave removed it. Say that you have taken it to be out of the way ofthe smoke, inasmuch as it is no longer what it was when Ulysses wentaway, but has become soiled and begrimed with soot. Add to this moreparticularly that you are afraid Jove may set them on to quarrelover their wine, and that they may do each other some harm which maydisgrace both banquet and wooing, for the sight of arms sometimestempts people to use them."

  • 罗希 07-30

      Thus did he speak, and they went on board even as he had said. Butas Telemachus was thus busied, praying also and sacrificing to Minervain the ship's stern, there came to him a man from a distant country, aseer, who was flying from Argos because he had killed a man. He wasdescended from Melampus, who used to live in Pylos, the land of sheep;he was rich and owned a great house, but he was driven into exile bythe great and powerful king Neleus. Neleus seized his goods and heldthem for a whole year, during which he was a close prisoner in thehouse of king Phylacus, and in much distress of mind both on accountof the daughter of Neleus and because he was haunted by a great sorrowthat dread Erinyes had laid upon him. In the end, however, heescaped with his life, drove the cattle from Phylace to Pylos, avengedthe wrong that had been done him, and gave the daughter of Neleus tohis brother. Then he left the country and went to Argos, where itwas ordained that he should reign over much people. There hemarried, established himself, and had two famous sons Antiphates andMantius. Antiphates became father of Oicleus, and Oicleus ofAmphiaraus, who was dearly loved both by Jove and by Apollo, but hedid not live to old age, for he was killed in Thebes by reason of awoman's gifts. His sons were Alcmaeon and Amphilochus. Mantius, theother son of Melampus, was father to Polypheides and Cleitus.Aurora, throned in gold, carried off Cleitus for his beauty's sake,that he might dwell among the immortals, but Apollo made Polypheidesthe greatest seer in the whole world now that Amphiaraus was dead.He quarrelled with his father and went to live in Hyperesia, wherehe remained and prophesied for all men.

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