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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:张添佑 大小:IHA3mM7I55001KB 下载:5veloqOA68270次
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日期:2020-08-05 14:13:57
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刘晓虎

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Even so, however, I did not get them away without misadventure.We had with us a certain youth named Elpenor, not very remarkablefor sense or courage, who had got drunk and was lying on the house-topaway from the rest of the men, to sleep off his liquor in the cool.When he heard the noise of the men bustling about, he jumped up on asudden and forgot all about coming down by the main staircase, so hetumbled right off the roof and broke his neck, and his soul wentdown to the house of Hades.
2.  "My friend," said Nestor, "now that you remind me, I remember tohave heard that your mother has many suitors, who are ill disposedtowards you and are making havoc of your estate. Do you submit to thistamely, or are public feeling and the voice of heaven against you? Whoknows but what Ulysses may come back after all, and pay thesescoundrels in full, either single-handed or with a force of Achaeansbehind him? If Minerva were to take as great a liking to you as shedid to Ulysses when we were fighting before Troy (for I never yetsaw the gods so openly fond of any one as Minerva then was of yourfather), if she would take as good care of you as she did of him,these wooers would soon some of them him, forget their wooing."
3.  They all held their peace except King Alcinous, who began, "Sir,we have had much pleasure in hearing all that you have told us, fromwhich I understand that you are willing to show your prowess, ashaving been displeased with some insolent remarks that have beenmade to you by one of our athletes, and which could never have beenuttered by any one who knows how to talk with propriety. I hope youwill apprehend my meaning, and will explain to any be one of yourchief men who may be dining with yourself and your family when you gethome, that we have an hereditary aptitude for accomplishments of allkinds. We are not particularly remarkable for our boxing, nor yet aswrestlers, but we are singularly fleet of foot and are excellentsailors. We are extremely fond of good dinners, music, and dancing; wealso like frequent changes of linen, warm baths, and good beds, sonow, please, some of you who are the best dancers set about dancing,that our guest on his return home may be able to tell his friendshow much we surpass all other nations as sailors, runners, dancers,minstrels. Demodocus has left his lyre at my house, so run some one orother of you and fetch it for him."
4.  Then Ulysses said, "Sir, it is right that I should say somethingmyself. I am much shocked about what you have said about theinsolent way in which the suitors are behaving in despite of such aman as you are. Tell me, do you submit to such treatment tamely, orhas some god set your people against you? May you not complain of yourbrothers- for it is to these that a man may look for support,however great his quarrel may be? I wish I were as young as you areand in my present mind; if I were son to Ulysses, or, indeed,Ulysses himself, I would rather some one came and cut my head off, butI would go to the house and be the bane of every one of these men.If they were too many for me- I being single-handed- I would ratherdie fighting in my own house than see such disgraceful sights dayafter day, strangers grossly maltreated, and men dragging the womenservants about the house in an unseemly way, wine drawn recklessly,and bread wasted all to no purpose for an end that shall never beaccomplished."
5.  On hearing this Telemachus smiled to his father, but so that Eumaeuscould not see him.
6.  "'When your crew have taken you past these Sirens, I cannot give youcoherent directions as to which of two courses you are to take; I willlay the two alternatives before you, and you must consider them foryourself. On the one hand there are some overhanging rocks againstwhich the deep blue waves of Amphitrite beat with terrific fury; theblessed gods call these rocks the Wanderers. Here not even a birdmay pass, no, not even the timid doves that bring ambrosia to FatherJove, but the sheer rock always carries off one of them, and FatherJove has to send another to make up their number; no ship that everyet came to these rocks has got away again, but the waves andwhirlwinds of fire are freighted with wreckage and with the bodiesof dead men. The only vessel that ever sailed and got through, was thefamous Argo on her way from the house of Aetes, and she too would havegone against these great rocks, only that Juno piloted her past themfor the love she bore to Jason.

计划指导

1.  "You say truly, my dear father," answered Telemachus, "and you shallsee, if you will, that I am in no mind to disgrace your family."
2.  On this the gods gathered to the house of Vulcan. Earth-encirclingNeptune came, and Mercury the bringer of luck, and King Apollo, butthe goddesses stayed at home all of them for shame. Then the givers ofall good things stood in the doorway, and the blessed gods roared withinextinguishable laughter, as they saw how cunning Vulcan had been,whereon one would turn towards his neighbour saying:
3.  Then the god stayed his stream and stilled the waves, making allcalm before him, and bringing him safely into the mouth of theriver. Here at last Ulysses' knees and strong hands failed him, forthe sea had completely broken him. His body was all swollen, and hismouth and nostrils ran down like a river with sea-water, so that hecould neither breathe nor speak, and lay swooning from sheerexhaustion; presently, when he had got his breath and came tohimself again, he took off the scarf that Ino had given him andthrew it back into the salt stream of the river, whereon Inoreceived it into her hands from the wave that bore it towards her.Then he left the river, laid himself down among the rushes, and kissedthe bounteous earth.
4.  To this Eurymachus son of Polybus answered, "Take heart, QueenPenelope daughter of Icarius, and do not trouble yourself aboutthese matters. The man is not yet born, nor never will be, who shalllay hands upon your son Telemachus, while I yet live to look uponthe face of the earth. I say- and it shall surely be- that my spearshall be reddened with his blood; for many a time has Ulysses taken meon his knees, held wine up to my lips to drink, and put pieces of meatinto my hands. Therefore Telemachus is much the dearest friend I have,and has nothing to fear from the hands of us suitors. Of course, ifdeath comes to him from the gods, he cannot escape it." He said thisto quiet her, but in reality he was plotting against Telemachus.
5.  Telemachus said, "I will answer you quite truly. I am from Ithaca,and my father is 'Ulysses, as surely as that he ever lived. But he hascome to some miserable end. Therefore I have taken this ship and gotmy crew together to see if I can hear any news of him, for he has beenaway a long time."
6.  "I too," answered Theoclymenus, am an exile, for I have killed a manof my own race. He has many brothers and kinsmen in Argos, and theyhave great power among the Argives. I am flying to escape death attheir hands, and am thus doomed to be a wanderer on the face of theearth. I am your suppliant; take me, therefore, on board your shipthat they may not kill me, for I know they are in pursuit."

推荐功能

1.  BOOK VII.
2.  To this Telemachus answered, "By Jove, Agelaus, and by the sorrowsof my unhappy father, who has either perished far from Ithaca, or iswandering in some distant land, I throw no obstacles in the way ofmy mother's marriage; on the contrary I urge her to choosewhomsoever she will, and I will give her numberless gifts into thebargain, but I dare not insist point blank that she shall leave thehouse against her own wishes. Heaven forbid that I should do this."
3.  Meanwhile Philoetius slipped quietly out and made fast the gatesof the outer court. There was a ship's cable of byblus fibre lyingin the gatehouse, so he made the gates fast with it and then came inagain, resuming the seat that he had left, and keeping an eye onUlysses, who had now got the bow in his hands, and was turning itevery way about, and proving it all over to see whether the wormshad been eating into its two horns during his absence. Then wouldone turn towards his neighbour saying, "This is some tricky oldbow-fancier; either he has got one like it at home, or he wants tomake one, in such workmanlike style does the old vagabond handle it."
4.  "But I rushed at her with my sword drawn as though I would kill her,whereon she fell with a loud scream, clasped my knees, and spokepiteously, saying, 'Who and whence are you? from what place and peoplehave you come? How can it be that my drugs have no power to charm you?Never yet was any man able to stand so much as a taste of the herb Igave you; you must be spell-proof; surely you can be none other thanthe bold hero Ulysses, who Mercury always said would come here someday with his ship while on his way home form Troy; so be it then;sheathe your sword and let us go to bed, that we may make friendsand learn to trust each other.'
5.   "I will not refuse you," replied Telemachus, "if you wish to joinus. Come, therefore, and in Ithaca we will treat you hospitablyaccording to what we have."
6.  When she had done speaking Eumaeus went back to the suitors, forhe had explained everything. Then he went up to Telemachus and said inhis ear so that none could overhear him, "My dear sir, I will now goback to the pigs, to see after your property and my own business.You will look to what is going on here, but above all be careful tokeep out of danger, for there are many who bear you ill will. May Jovebring them to a bad end before they do us a mischief."

应用

1.  "Thus he spoke, and the Achaeans feared no more. The daughters ofthe old man of the sea stood round you weeping bitterly, and clothedyou in immortal raiment. The nine muses also came and lifted uptheir sweet voices in lament- calling and answering one another; therewas not an Argive but wept for pity of the dirge they chaunted. Daysand nights seven and ten we mourned you, mortals and immortals, but onthe eighteenth day we gave you to the flames, and many a fat sheepwith many an ox did we slay in sacrifice around you. You were burnt inraiment of the gods, with rich resins and with honey, while heroes,horse and foot, clashed their armour round the pile as you wereburning, with the tramp as of a great multitude. But when the flamesof heaven had done their work, we gathered your white bones atdaybreak and laid them in ointments and in pure wine. Your motherbrought us a golden vase to hold them- gift of Bacchus, and work ofVulcan himself; in this we mingled your bleached bones with those ofPatroclus who had gone before you, and separate we enclosed also thoseof Antilochus, who had been closer to you than any other of yourcomrades now that Patroclus was no more.
2.  "I should have done so at once," replied Neptune, "if I were notanxious to avoid anything that might displease you; now, therefore,I should like to wreck the Phaecian ship as it is returning from itsescort. This will stop them from escorting people in future; and Ishould also like to bury their city under a huge mountain."
3.  "I was broken hearted when I heard that I must go back all that longand terrible voyage to Egypt; nevertheless, I answered, 'I will doall, old man, that you have laid upon me; but now tell me, and tell metrue, whether all the Achaeans whom Nestor and I left behind us whenwe set sail from Troy have got home safely, or whether any one of themcame to a bad end either on board his own ship or among his friendswhen the days of his fighting were done.'
4、  And Minerva answered, "I will tell you truly and particularly allabout it. I am Mentes, son of Anchialus, and I am King of theTaphians. I have come here with my ship and crew, on a voyage to menof a foreign tongue being bound for Temesa with a cargo of iron, and Ishall bring back copper. As for my ship, it lies over yonder off theopen country away from the town, in the harbour Rheithron under thewooded mountain Neritum. Our fathers were friends before us, as oldLaertes will tell you, if you will go and ask him. They say,however, that he never comes to town now, and lives by himself inthe country, faring hardly, with an old woman to look after him andget his dinner for him, when he comes in tired from pottering abouthis vineyard. They told me your father was at home again, and that waswhy I came, but it seems the gods are still keeping him back, for heis not dead yet not on the mainland. It is more likely he is on somesea-girt island in mid ocean, or a prisoner among savages who aredetaining him against his will I am no prophet, and know very littleabout omens, but I speak as it is borne in upon me from heaven, andassure you that he will not be away much longer; for he is a man ofsuch resource that even though he were in chains of iron he would findsome means of getting home again. But tell me, and tell me true, canUlysses really have such a fine looking fellow for a son? You areindeed wonderfully like him about the head and eyes, for we were closefriends before he set sail for Troy where the flower of all theArgives went also. Since that time we have never either of us seen theother."
5、  "Hear me," he cried, "daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove, unweariable,hear me now, for you gave no heed to my prayers when Neptune waswrecking me. Now, therefore, have pity upon me and grant that I mayfind friends and be hospitably received by the Phaecians."

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网友评论(uEQUmVSE34734))

  • 童老二 08-04

      To this Penelope said, "My dear sir, of all the guests who everyet came to my house there never was one who spoke in all thingswith such admirable propriety as you do. There happens to be in thehouse a most respectable old woman- the same who received my poor dearhusband in her arms the night he was born, and nursed him ininfancy. She is very feeble now, but she shall wash your feet.""Come here," said she, "Euryclea, and wash your master's age-mate; Isuppose Ulysses' hands and feet are very much the same now as his are,for trouble ages all of us dreadfully fast."

  • 万达影城 08-04

      On this the women came down in a body, weeping and wailing bitterly.First they carried the dead bodies out, and propped them up againstone another in the gatehouse. Ulysses ordered them about and made themdo their work quickly, so they had to carry the bodies out. Whenthey had done this, they cleaned all the tables and seats with spongesand water, while Telemachus and the two others shovelled up theblood and dirt from the ground, and the women carried it all awayand put it out of doors. Then when they had made the whole place quiteclean and orderly, they took the women out and hemmed them in thenarrow space between the wall of the domed room and that of theyard, so that they could not get away: and Telemachus said to theother two, "I shall not let these women die a clean death, for theywere insolent to me and my mother, and used to sleep with thesuitors."

  • 崔巧琳 08-04

       Irus began to be very uneasy as he heard them, but the servantsgirded him by force, and brought him [into the open part of the court]in such a fright that his limbs were all of a tremble. Antinousscolded him and said, "You swaggering bully, you ought never to havebeen born at all if you are afraid of such an old broken-down creatureas this tramp is. I say, therefore- and it shall surely be- if hebeats you and proves himself the better man, I shall pack you off onboard ship to the mainland and send you to king Echetus, who killsevery one that comes near him. He will cut off your nose and ears, anddraw out your entrails for the dogs to eat."

  • 张延亮 08-04

      And Eumaeus answered, "Antinous, your birth is good but your wordsevil. It was no doing of mine that he came here. Who is likely toinvite a stranger from a foreign country, unless it be one of thosewho can do public service as a seer, a healer of hurts, a carpenter,or a bard who can charm us with his Such men are welcome all the worldover, but no one is likely to ask a beggar who will only worry him.You are always harder on Ulysses' servants than any of the othersuitors are, and above all on me, but I do not care so long asTelemachus and Penelope are alive and here."

  • 张燕生 08-03

    {  Then they roasted the outer meat, drew it off the spits, gaveevery man his portion, and feasted to their hearts' content; those whowaited at table gave Ulysses exactly the same portion as the othershad, for Telemachus had told them to do so.

  • 戴水莲 08-02

      Calypso knew him at once- for the gods all know each other, nomatter how far they live from one another- but Ulysses was not within;he was on the sea-shore as usual, looking out upon the barren oceanwith tears in his eyes, groaning and breaking his heart for sorrow.Calypso gave Mercury a seat and said: "Why have you come to see me,Mercury- honoured, and ever welcome- for you do not visit me often?Say what you want; I will do it for be you at once if I can, and if itcan be done at all; but come inside, and let me set refreshment beforeyou.}

  • 潘才如 08-02

      This frightened Irus still more, but they brought him into themiddle of the court, and the two men raised their hands to fight. ThenUlysses considered whether he should let drive so hard at him as tomake an end of him then and there, or whether he should give him alighter blow that should only knock him down; in the end he deemedit best to give the lighter blow for fear the Achaeans should begin tosuspect who he was. Then they began to fight, and Irus hit Ulysseson the right shoulder; but Ulysses gave Irus a blow on the neckunder the ear that broke in the bones of his skull, and the blood camegushing out of his mouth; he fell groaning in the dust, gnashing histeeth and kicking on the ground, but the suitors threw up theirhands and nearly died of laughter, as Ulysses caught hold of him bythe foot and dragged him into the outer court as far as thegate-house. There he propped him up against the wall and put his staffin his hands. "Sit here," said he, "and keep the dogs and pigs off;you are a pitiful creature, and if you try to make yourself king ofthe beggars any more you shall fare still worse."

  • 王晨光 08-02

      He took an arrow that was lying upon the table- for those whichthe Achaeans were so shortly about to taste were all inside thequiver- he laid it on the centre-piece of the bow, and drew thenotch of the arrow and the string toward him, still seated on hisseat. When he had taken aim he let fly, and his arrow pierced everyone of the handle-holes of the axes from the first onwards till it hadgone right through them, and into the outer courtyard. Then he said toTelemachus:

  • 吴欣见 08-01

       "Stranger," said she, "rise and let us be going back to the town;I will introduce you at the house of my excellent father, where Ican tell you that you will meet all the best people among thePhaecians. But be sure and do as I bid you, for you seem to be asensible person. As long as we are going past the fields- and farmlands, follow briskly behind the waggon along with the maids and Iwill lead the way myself. Presently, however, we shall come to thetown, where you will find a high wall running all round it, and a goodharbour on either side with a narrow entrance into the city, and theships will be drawn up by the road side, for every one has a placewhere his own ship can lie. You will see the market place with atemple of Neptune in the middle of it, and paved with large stonesbedded in the earth. Here people deal in ship's gear of all kinds,such as cables and sails, and here, too, are the places where oars aremade, for the Phaeacians are not a nation of archers; they knownothing about bows and arrows, but are a sea-faring folk, and pridethemselves on their masts, oars, and ships, with which they travel farover the sea.

  • 张志成 07-30

    {  Now Neptune had gone off to the Ethiopians, who are at the world'send, and lie in two halves, the one looking West and the other East.He had gone there to accept a hecatomb of sheep and oxen, and wasenjoying himself at his festival; but the other gods met in thehouse of Olympian Jove, and the sire of gods and men spoke first. Atthat moment he was thinking of Aegisthus, who had been killed byAgamemnon's son Orestes; so he said to the other gods:

  • 菲瑞特尔 07-30

      They left their sports as he told them, and when they were withinthe house, they laid their cloaks on the benches and seats inside, andthen sacrificed some sheep, goats, pigs, and a heifer, all of them fatand well grown. Thus they made ready for their meal. In the meantimeUlysses and the swineherd were about starting for the town, and theswineherd said, "Stranger, I suppose you still want to go to townto-day, as my master said you were to do; for my own part I shouldhave liked you to stay here as a station hand, but I must do as mymaster tells me, or he will scold me later on, and a scolding fromone's master is a very serious thing. Let us then be off, for it isnow broad day; it will be night again directly and then you willfind it colder."

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